Year1

Year 1 Apprenticeship

Costs:

Apprenticeship Program Year 1

Year 1

$1292.00

Required Books

 

$141.95

Delmar 6th Edition
Refrigeration & AC Technology

  $90.00 ICC Residential
  $81.50 ICC Fuel Gas
  $81.50 ICC Mechanical

Year 1 (150 hours of instruction)

Year 1 Program Learning Objectives:

Year 1

1. The apprentice will demonstrate new knowledge in the subjects of Basic Safety, Basic Math, Hand & Power Tools, Introduction to Applied Science, Energy Sources, Introduction to Code, Customer Service, Fuel Piping and Venting; by earning an overall average score of 75% or higher in the combined year’s curriculum.

2. The apprentice will actively participate in the program’s discussion forums, as confirmed by the forum logs and discussion grades, by earning an overall average score of 75% or higher in the combined year’s curriculum

Basic Safety (18 hours)

  • Labels, MSDS, and Training (OSHA Stuff)

Introduction:  This is the beginning of lessons on safety and regulations for the worker in the HVAC/R industry. HVAC/R work normally falls into the “construction trades” segment of the OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration)
regulations of the United States Department of Labor. The general OSHA regulations are from OSHA Standard – 29 and exist as PART 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards and PART 1926 Safety and Health Regulations for Construction.

A lot of HVAC/R work comes from construction; but, don’t forget the service side of the industry. After the equipment is installed, someone has to keep it operating efficiently and trouble free. That would be the service
technician.

In this lesson we will discuss Hazard Communication. We will learn about labels for hazardous materials. We will study how to read and access information from the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) and how that information can be utilized to keep your workplace safe.

  • Personal Protective Equipment

Introduction:  HVACR technicians work on and around and with electrical equipment and tools every day. “Electricity is us” you might say. It isn’t little electricity either, it’s major circuits with the power to seriously injure or kill upon contact. Of all the things in our workplace, electricity is the most common danger to the un-informed or those with an unsafe attitude. The purpose of this module is to inform you of the dangers and advise you of how to work with and around electrical devices and tools.

Most of the information that discusses electrical safety is just plain old common sense, but that is true of the entire safety concept. We have selected a set of web sites and tutorials for you to go through and will supplement the web and text material with the presentation and discussion with your instructor. Your goal for this module is to understand the hazards of electricity to yourself and fellow workers. This understanding should then help keep you safe.

  • Personal Safety in Confined Spaces and on Ladders

In this module we will cover the basic personal safety issues that exist in the HVAC/R workplace. These issues are identified by the individual worker’s awareness of his/her environment and preparing to work in that environment . Safety is an attitude! We will cover the definition of confined spaces, atmospheric hazards, flammable atmospheres, toxic gases, solvents, physical hazards, and ladder safety.

OSHA Regulations (Standards – 29 CFR) Table of Contents for Part 1910 Subpart I – Personal Protective Equipment

  • 1910.132 – General requirements.
  • 1910.133 – Eye and face protection.
  • 1910.134 – Respiratory Protection.
  • 1910.134 App A – Fit Testing Procedures (Mandatory).
  • 1910.134 App B-1 – User Seal Check Procedures (Mandatory).
  • 1910.134 App B-2 – Respirator Cleaning Procedures (Mandatory).
  • 1910.134 App C – OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire (Mandatory).
  • 1910.134 App D – (Mandatory) Information for Employees Using Respirators When not Required Under Standard.
  • 1910.135 – Head protection.
  • 1910.136 – Occupational foot protection.
  • 1910.137 – Electrical protective devices.
  • 1910.138 – Hand Protection.
  • 1910.139 – Respiratory protection for M. tuberculosis.
  • 1910 Subpart I – Authority for 1910 Subpart I
  • 1910 Subpart I App A – References for further information (Non-mandatory)
  • 1910 Subpart I App B – Non-mandatory Compliance Guidelines for Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection.

OSHA Regulations (Standards – 29 CFR) Table of Contents for Part 1926 Subpart E – Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

  • 1926.95 – Criteria for personal protective equipment.
  • 1926.96 – Occupational foot protection.
  • 1926.97 – [Reserved]
  • 1926.98 – [Reserved]
  • 1926.99 – [Reserved]
  • 1926.100 – Head protection.
  • 1926.101 – Hearing protection.
  • 1926.102 – Eye and face protection.
  • 1926.103 – Respiratory protection.
  • 1926.104 – Safety belts, lifelines, and lanyards.
  • 1926.105 – Safety nets.
  • 1926.106 – Working over or near water.
  • 1926.107 – Definitions applicable to this subpart.
  • 1926 Subpart E – Authority for 1926 Subpart E
  • Fire Extinguishers and Compressed Gases

The use of fire extinguishers and the handling of compressed gases are two subjects technicians should have training in. Both of the subjects are pertinent to the HVAC/R occupation. Daily, as a regular part of our work, we use compressed gases. We solder and braze with torches in every imaginable location; hopefully, with a fire extinguisher close by. This module will teach you how to use compressed gases intelligently and safely as part of your HVAC/R work.

  • Lockout / Tagout

HVAC/R technicians work on, around and with electrical equipment and tools every day. “Electricity is us” you might say. It isn’t little electricity either, it’s major circuits with the power to seriously injure or kill upon contact. Of all the things in our workplace, electricity is the most common danger to the uninformed or those with an unsafe attitude. The purpose of this module is to inform you of the dangers and advise you of how to work with and around electrical devices and tools.

Most of the information that discusses electrical safety is just plain common sense, but that is true of the entire safety concept. We have selected a set of websites and tutorials for you to go through. We will supplement the web and text material with the presentation. Your goal for this module is to understand electricity’s hazards to yourself and fellow workers. This understanding should help keep you safe.

  • Back Safety, Scaffolds / Lifts, and Fall Protection

This module is a catch all for the safety topics that should be covered for an HVAC/R technician. This does not mean that your back or being safe on a scaffold is not important. On the contrary, both topics deserve exposure and study, especially to HVAC/R people.

One of my hot buttons is back safety. It seems that too many folks trying to get the job done end up stressing their back because they didn’t think. Once you have a bad back, it stays that way for a long time. As you go through the module, remember what I’ve said about bad backs.

Scaffolds and lifts are a reality in our workplace and with them comes fall protection. You need to know the safe way use and work from scaffolds and lifts. Don’t become one of the statistics you will read about in this module.

Basic Construction Math (12 hours)

  • Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of Whole Numbers
  • Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of Common Fractions
  • Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of Decimal Fractions

Basic Hand and Power Tools (6 hours)

  • Hand Tools

This section of the Idaho Apprentice Year 1 is all about the tools we use in
the field.  You will be introduced to the common HVAC work tools with
emphasis on safe and proper usage. 

  • Power Tools

Upon Completion of this module, you will be able to do the following: 

  1. Identify power tools commonly used in the construction trades
  2. Use power tools safely
  3. Explain how to maintain power tools properly

Intro to Applied Science (24 hours)

  • Measurements are Important

    One of the measures of a good technician is how well he measures! It used to drive me nuts when a technician came to me to discuss a service problem.  When I asked specifics about a measurement (like what was the pressure, amperage, belt dimension; you name it, I asked it), the response was often “well it was about”. At that point I knew that the tech would have to return to the site and get an accurate measure of whatever about was.

    In HVAC/R, we are engaged in an almost exact science. I say almost exact because often our measurements depend on other conditions. These are measurements like amperage, pressure, draft, flow, volume, temperature, and density. All of these can be measured accurately but also have to be noted with the existing conditions. Other measures such as linear, area and volume are fixed one, two or three linear measurements. Volume can be flexible, it depends on what the volume is.

    As a technician, whatever you are measuring, you must be as accurate and complete as possible to provide the information needed to make intelligent decisions in your work. You may already be a highly competent measurement person, if so this module will be a piece of cake. If not, be attentive, measurement is important. Wade through this material with a mindset of professionalism and you will benefit.

  • Heat

    Oh boy, here we go laying the footing for the foundation of your knowledge in the HVAC/R world. Make no mistake, everything that we will discuss and have discussed in this course is key to your understanding of how all this stuff works. That doesn’t mean that you will “get it” straightaway; but, it will be there as we go along and when you need to “put it all together”.

    In this module, we will talk about water and its three physical states on this planet. We discuss water inside, out and backwards! We use water because it is so familiar to everyone. We will see how water changes state with the addition of heat or removal of heat. We will study the amount of heat it takes to change water’s state. We will identify the different zones and types of heat energy on the water heat/content chart. All of these things are very relevant to the HVAC/R industry; an industry that is in the business of manipulating heat energy.

  • Pressure

    Pressure is defined as force per unit area. Pressure is usually measured in pounds per square inch (PSI) in refrigeration cycle work or in inches of water or mercury column for many other HVAC/R applications. In this module we will discuss pressure and the ways, devices and scales used to measure pressure and specific HVAC/R applications. 

    You will discover that most HVAC/R work is defined by some type of pressure required to make a process perform correctly. We are required to accurately measure very tiny pressures in microns to large pressures of hundreds of pounds. HVAC/R technicians truly do work under pressure!

  • Gas Works

    We have studied the water heat/temperature chart and numerous other facets of weights, measures, etc. Now we will put that information to work. In this module, we will discuss how pressure effects the temperatures of the change of state from liquid to vapor and vapor to liquid. This is critical knowledge to someone interested in HVAC/R technology. We manipulate temperatures by controlling pressures in a refrigeration system.

    We will examine the P/T (pressure/temperature) chart and how to use it with different substances. We will discuss the basic concepts of the gas laws that are used in the HVAC/R industry. We will conclude with some examples of those laws.

  • Air Works

    This module is intended as the beginning of your understanding of air. We will look at the different properties of air and the factors that are important to an HVAC/R technician working with air systems. This information is the basis of many other air type functions that you will be working with as a technician.

  • Atomic Theory

    This module is designed to familiarize you with the basic concepts and parts of an atom that we use to make electrical energy work for us. Don’t underestimate the power of understanding! You will find (in time) that the better you understand something (anything) at its most basic level, the better you will understand it at more complex levels. Be sure to study the electron thoroughly in its natural habitat. After all, the electron is the basic level of electricity.

Energy Sources (12 hours)

  • What is Energy

    The importance of being able to calculate conversions from one energy form to another is understated for technicians. Your ability to do so is important in your job.  But, equally important is the ability to recognize what is happening when you see processes that are energy conversions occurring but perhaps not obvious to the average person.  We have listed 9 conversions just to run a blower in a furnace. I suppose that some are debatable but the primary purpose is to cause you to think. A common trait of most folks is to take things for granted. When it comes to the energy business, there is a lot going on behind the scenes. An HVAC/R technician is very concerned with energy use (it’s our job). Your recognition of what’s “really” going on will make you more successful.

  • Characteristics of Fuel Oil and Principles of Combustion

In this module we will learn where fuel oil comes from and how it gets to the homes and businesses where it is used. It is an interesting story that helps us understand where oil is and is not used. It will also make us aware of several economic factors that determine the market price of oil. We will also learn what is required for combustion to take place, specifically the combustion of fuel oil.

  • Fuel Gas Composition

    The most common methods of heating (in no particular order of importance) are Electric, Gas, Oil and Heat pumps. There are other methods, such as Solar, but we will only discuss the methods listed above for now. Many factors dictate the use of these methods. They include cost efficiency, geography, availability, installation and/or personal preference.  Electric Heat and Heat Pumps are essentially electric in nature.  With Gas and oil, we burn the fuel to create the heat and then distribute it to the areas intended to be heated. This course will deal with Fuel Gases and Gas Heating Systems.

  • What is Hydronic Heating

    In this module we will take a brief look at the history of radiant heating and discuss what hydronic heating means. We will start delving into the major parts of a hydronic system. We will also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of installing a radiant heating design in a building (as compared to the standard forced-air furnace and related ductwork).

Intro to Code (12 hours)

The main purpose of “Code” is to establish standards for design, construction and installation of equipment, in our case specifically HVACR equipment. An HVACR system which is installed and meets or exceeds the minimum requirement per “Code” insures the safety and health of any and all occupants which come in contact with the equipment directly or indirectly. Human safety is of the utmost consideration when developing “Code” for equipment, other factors to be taken into account are energy efficiency and performance criteria.
Objectives:

  • Understand Difference Between Codes and Standards
  • Understand the Purpose of Code
  • Understand the Purpose of a Code Official
  • Understand Adoption of Code by Municipalities
  • Understand How Code Books are Updated and Maintained
  • Understand Title, Scope and Purpose of Code Books
  • Understand How Code Books Utilize a Numbering System

Customer Service (6 hours)

  • Work Habits

Before any of us can provide first class customer service, we need to be valued employees. To be a valued employee, we first need to master our own lives. This module provides inside information on how to prepare for the world of work by learning great personal work habits.
Objectives: Students will learn very basic personal habits that prepare them for the world of work.

  • Time Management & Priorities
  • Personal Cleanliness
  • Dress for Work
  • Meal Planning
  • Money Management
  • Leave Personal Issues at Home
  • Travel to Work
  • Dependability
  • Industry Paperwork & Recordkeeping

Good heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are important features of every structure. When you install a new system in a structure, or service an existing system, there is always paperwork. You must follow typical industry practices concerning the quote, work order, service receipts, and customer literature/paperwork, among other things. This module will focus on the industry paperwork and recordkeeping that pertains to the system installation and/or repair.
Objectives: (What you are supposed to know at the end of this lesson)

  • Understand an overview of industry paperwork and record-keeping
  • Understand residential HVAC
  • Understand commercial HVAC
  • Understand a quote/proposal and acceptance of proposal
  • Understand the bill of materials
  • Understand start up check sheets
  • Understand warranty cards
  • Understand warranty certificates
  • Understand installation instructions
  • Understand the homeowner’s information
  • Understand maintenance/service instructions
  • Understand the unit parts list
  • Understand troubleshooting guides
  • Understand bid proposals
  • Understand design build
  • Understand commercial commissioning
  • Understand record-keeping
  • Communications & Work Relationships

Technicians are often the only contact a customer has with any company. The way they are treated reflects on the entire operations of the company. Communicating and conducting yourself in a professional manner gives customers the reassurance that the company has good business practices and is worthy of recommendations to friends and family, and for return business.
Objectives: Students will learn the basics of verbal and non-verbal communications with customers and how to conduct themselves in work relationships.

  • Students will learn how to make a good first impression.
  • Students will learn what makes up non-verbal communications
  • Students will learn several aspects of verbal communications
  • Students will learn skills to improve their listening
  • Students will learn what courtesy is
  • Students will learn the definition of relationships
  • Students will learn the roles and expectations of work relationships
  • Students will learn how to conclude the service call on a positive note

 

Fuel Piping (30 hours)

  • Fuel Gas Composition

The most common methods of heating (in no particular order of importance) are Electric, Gas, Oil and Heat pumps. There are other methods, such as Solar, but we will only discuss the methods listed above for now. Many factors dictate the use of these methods. They include cost efficiency, geography, availability, installation and/or personal preference.  Electric Heat and Heat Pumps are essentially electric in nature.  With Gas and oil, we burn the fuel to create the heat and then distribute it to the areas intended to be heated. This course will deal with Fuel Gases and Gas Heating Systems.

  • Fuel Gas Properties

This module is to provide you with a set of reference materials that will come in handy for any fuel gas course. Most of the reference materials provided here are related to Fuel Gas Properties, Distribution and other fundamental issues that someone working with fuel gas should have available.

http://www.naturalgas.org/overview/background.asp

  • Intro for LP Gas

http://www.worldlpgas.com/what-is-lp-gas

  • IFGC Introduction

This module is dedicated to showing you what we think is important to know about the front end of the text book that will be our guide for this section on Fuel Gas Piping. 
In this first section of codes we will cover the first 4 chapters of the IFGC with most of the study in Chapter 4.  That being said, we will also cover this part of the text and the first three chapters by pointing out what is important. 
The way this part of the course works it to click through the list of linked “pdf” files listed below to move through this presentation portion of the Gas Piping Codes section.  On many of the pdf’s there is two icons.  One is a “comment” icon and the other is a “speaker” icon.  By double clicking on the comment icon you will read my comments on the section shown.  If you click on the speaker icon you will hear my audio comments (if you have speakers) on the code presented.  The audio and text comments are the same. 

  • IFGC Code Book

Chapter 1:  This chapter of the code is dedicated to the administration of the codes by the agency that adopts the codes and the building officials that inspect the installations of fuel gas equipment and systems.  We will only point out the significant codes as they apply to the installing technician in the field.  Others not listed here are in your text to be studied and commented on in the conference as you or your instructor may wish to discuss them further.

Chapter 2: 

Chapter 3:

Venting (30 hours)

  • Venting and Piping of Gas Appliances

The venting and gas piping of gas appliances may be the responsibility of the installation technician, however the proper methods and safety aspects are equally important to the service technician. The service technician must be able to identify when the flue system or gas piping is not properly or legally installed. Simple improprieties of installation will often result in customer complaints that appear to be a service problem. We will reference all applicable codes that affect these functions, but it is important that the technician adhere to the codes that apply to the area where the unit is located. The following practices and procedures will represent some of the common codes and practices but obviously can not represent all codes that may exist and govern your geographical area.

  • Venting Code

    IFGC Code Chapter 5

  • Venting Resources

    Hart & Cooley Sizing Guide

  • Venting Exercises

    Vent Sizing Exercise 1
    Multi Vent Sizing Exercise 2
    Vent Sizing Exercise 2
    Vent Exercise 3